How to Make Natural Easter Egg Dye

For a few years now, I’ve found myself lured in by natural Easter egg dye. How cool is it that you can boil vegetables, spices, berries, and more, and get gorgeous, naturally-colored Easter eggs – in every color of a rainbow, and then some – as a result?!

Natural Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs Made Easy - Red cabbage makes blue eggs, ground turmeric makes yellow, and beets make pink! So simple and fun.

Natural Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs Made Easy - Red cabbage makes blue eggs, ground turmeric makes yellow, and beets make pink! So simple and fun.

But I always went a little crazy. Okay – a lot crazy. I’d raid the produce department, and then I’d get home and no pot or pan would remain unturned. With colorful brews brewing away on every available surface, my kitchen would look like a witch’s coven. And I’d think, okay, so it’s fun in theory to geek out over naturally-dyed eggs, but this is just ridiculous. I don’t have time for this. I’d think, next year, I’ve got to simplify.

So this year, I did it! I simplified. I made exactly three springy, pastel, perfect-for-Easter shades for our eggs – pink, yellow, and pale blue. And it was easy – low-fuss and no-muss.

Natural Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs Made Easy - Red cabbage makes blue eggs, ground turmeric makes yellow, and beets make pink! So simple and fun.

Making my vegetable-based dyes this year was so simple, I was almost stunned! The day before, I brewed up the dyes, then I sealed them up in mason jars and refrigerated them until the following day, at which point my giddy two-year-old and I happily dyed the eggs.

Natural Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs Made Easy - Red cabbage makes blue eggs, ground turmeric makes yellow, and beets make pink! So simple and fun.

Hands down, our favorite hue is the gorgeous true blue that, remarkably, is created with red cabbage. The pink eggs are compliments of a beet; for yellow, I needn’t look further than my spice cabinet for some ground turmeric (which, actually, is not technically a vegetable – it’s a herbaceous perennial related to ginger, but it’s close enough).

Natural Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs Made Easy - Red cabbage makes blue eggs, ground turmeric makes yellow, and beets make pink! So simple and fun.

My two-year-old enjoyed dying the eggs more than I expected. It was so fun for her to plop the eggs into the dye and see how they would change color after a minute – or two, or 10, or 30. Yes – I ended up with a few cracked eggs – she is only two, after all. Oh well.

And you know what? My little one didn’t care that we didn’t end up with 24 different shades. Blue, yellow, and pink were plenty exciting – for her, and for me, too.

Natural Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs Made Easy - Red cabbage makes blue eggs, ground turmeric makes yellow, and beets make pink! So simple and fun.

Would you like to know how to to make natural Easter egg dye yourself? It’s easy – so, so easy. I promise. Especially when you don’t go nuts like I used to do.

Here’s a quick graphic with the ingredients and dye times to achieve the pretty pastel shades I was going for. And below that, I’ve provided more detailed instructions.

Natural Vegetable-Dyed Easter Eggs Made Easy - Red cabbage makes blue eggs, ground turmeric makes yellow, and beets make pink! So simple and fun.

Lesson officially learned: All you’ve got to do is keep it simple, and coloring your own Easter eggs with natural vegetable dyes is a piece of cake.

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How to Make Natural Easter Egg Dye

Make pastel blue, yellow, and pink Easter eggs using only veggies and spices. Super easy!

Ingredients:

Blue dye:

  • 1/2 head red cabbage, cut into 1/8ths (about 1 pound)
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar

Yellow dye:

  • 2 teaspoons ground turmeric
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar

Pink dye:

  • 1 medium beet, washed and quartered
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar

Directions:

Before starting the actual egg-dying process, I recommend preparing a safe area to handle these highly-staining dyes – they will mark everything from clothes to kitchen counters! So be sure to cover your table or counter with plastic, an old throw-away tablecloth, or lots of newspapers before beginning.

Blue Easter egg dye:

  1. Place cabbage and water in a medium-sized pot over high heat. Bring to a boil, then cover and remove from heat. Let sit for 1 hour. Pour mixture through a colander to remove cabbage; discard solids. Stir in vinegar. Your dye is ready to use.
  2. To dye, fill a narrow glass or mason jar about half full with dye, and gently lower in the egg. Let sit for about 20 minutes, turning occasionally. Proceed to Finishing step. Note: the egg will appear lavender when you first remove it from the dye, but the shade should transform to a more blue-ish shade within a few minutes.

Yellow Easter egg dye:

  1. Place turmeric and water in a medium-sized pot over high heat. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and cover. Let sit until cool. Stir in vinegar. Your dye is ready to use.
  2. Fill a narrow glass or mason jar about half full with the dye, and gently lower in the egg. Let sit for about 30 minutes, turning occasionally, until you’ve reached the shade of pale yellow that you desire. Proceed to Finishing step.

Pink Easter egg dye:

  1. Place beet and water in a medium-sized pot over high heat. Bring to a boil. Cover and remove from heat. Let sit for 60 minutes. Drain through a colander to remove beet pieces and discard solids. Stir in vinegar. Your dye is ready!
  2. To dye, fill a narrow glass or mason jar about half full with the dye, and gently lower in the egg. Let sit for about 2 minutes, turning occasionally, until you’ve reached the shade of pink that you desire. Proceed to Finishing step.

Finishing the eggs:

  1. Using a slotted spoon, carefully remove the eggs from the dye and set them in a shallow bowl. Or if you have wire egg holders, now is a great time to use them! Turn the eggs occasionally to help them dry, which should take about 20 minutes or so. Once they’re mostly dry, wipe off any excess dye with a paper towel. If desired, gently rub a little olive oil onto each egg to add a bit of a pretty sheen.
  2. Keep your eggs in the refrigerator just as you would any hard-boiled eggs!

My instructions call for a dozen eggs, and I never dye more than that (one can only eat so many egg salad sandwiches!), but these recipes make enough dye for more than that – I suspect up to several dozen, if you wish.

All images and text © for Kitchen Treaty.

How to make natural Easter egg dye the simple and easy way! Using only red cabbage, turmeric, beets, water, and vinegar. Love these pretty pastel Easter eggs!

Karen Raye

Kare is a vegetarian home cook living among carnivores. She loves creating irresistible and flexible recipes that help multi-vore families like hers keep the peace - deliciously.