How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee

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Today I’m partnering with one of my favorites, Silk, to bring you this Japanese iced coffee tutorial. Silk asked me to share a recipe or method that shows how I make my morning coffee better, and truth be told, I’ve been wanting to share this new iced coffee recipe with you all for awhile now – so the timing was perfect! This method definitely makes my mornings better. Good iced coffee in (practically) an instant? That’s a win right there.

Now through May 6, Silk and So Delicious creamers are 15% off when you use the super-slick Cartwheel app from Target, and they couldn’t be more perfect for doctoring up your fancy new iced coffee in a healthier, dairy-free way. You can find creamers in flavors like vanilla, caramel (my fave in iced coffee), and hazelnut right in the Target coolers with the milk in the grocery section.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

I’m not ashamed to admit that the center of my morning routine is, without a doubt, coffee. COFFEE, actually – all caps – bleary-eyed, arms outstretched, outta-my-way-I-need-a-latte level coffee.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

These days, we are pretty married to our pour-over carafe. My guy is a routine man, and every weekday morning like clockwork he wakes up at 5:30 a.m., showers, heads downstairs, puts away any dishes that left out to dry overnight. And then he starts the process of making coffee. Grind the beans, warm the carafe, boil the water, add the grounds to the thick paper filter, patiently pour the water over to make a few perfect mugsful. The pour-over method isn’t as easy or as fast as many others, but it results in a seriously killer cup of coffee.

Come spring and summer, though, hot coffee doesn’t sound quite as good to me. My guy, he never wavers from his steaming-hot cup, but I like a tall, strong glass of iced coffee just as well – maybe even better – once the weather warms.

I’m a huge fan of cold-brewed iced coffee concentrate, but the half-day process requires some planning ahead, and truthfully, much of the time I’m not so great at that.

Enter a newish-to-me, practically instant method that results in an incredible glass of iced coffee: Japanese-Style Iced Coffee!

I started making Japanese-style iced coffee last year, and I pretty much became an instant fanatic.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

So what’s the difference, you ask, between cold brew and Japanese style, other than the fact that one takes 12 hours and one takes 12 minutes (if that)?

Well, with Japanese-style, you only get one serving at a time – as opposed to cold brew, where you can fix up a whole big batch at a time. So keep that in mind, depending on how much caffeine you’re looking to consume.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

Flavor-wise, cold brew is famous for producing a mellow yet potent elixir that’s rich, relatively free of acid, and tastes almost chocolatey. Japanese-style, on the other hand, is known for retaining more of the nuances of flavor that you lose when coffee doesn’t ever meet hot water. You get a bit more acid, yes, but still a full-flavored cuppa. Or jarra, as the case may be, because I brew my Japanese-method cold brew right into a mason jar. High class, baby. Add some creamer, plop in a straw, and hallelujah: delicious caffeine.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

You can also make it in a glass pour-over carafe, but to be honest, with its thin glass and my propensity toward breaking things, it makes me kind of nervous plonking ice cubes into one. Which is why I started using a mason jar and a simple ceramic coffee dripper instead. Why not?!

There are a few resources out there for how to make Japanese-style iced coffee, and they are very thorough. But coffee, like wine, can be a little highfalutin and even controversial. I can usually recognize and adore a great cup of coffee, but a coffee snob I am not. So let’s maybe just call this one How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee for the Average Joe. I’m keeping it simple and straightforward to give you somewhere to start. I mean, does it get any easier than brewing directly into your drinking vessel?

Many instructions call for the use of a scale, and if you have it, I do second that suggestion (because it makes things so easy!) But it’s definitely not required. You can also brew your iced coffee this way with a few simple measurements.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

Take these instructions and run with ’em, my friend. Adjust the amount of coffee grounds until your Japanese-style iced coffee is just how you like it. Make it your own! Add a bit of brown sugar, some vanilla, maybe a cardamom pod or two to the grounds, and perhaps finish with your favorite Silk or So Delicious creamer.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

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How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee

Want high-quality iced coffee in minutes? This method makes it happen by brewing coffee right over the ice. I make mine even simpler by placing a pour-over cone right over a big mason jar. Just add cream, plop in a straw, and morning’s made!

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup/1 oz./30 g. ground coffee beans (I like a darker roast)
  • 2 cups/8 oz./230 g. ice cubes (plus more for serving)
  • 2 cups/8 oz./230 g. water

Equipment:

  • Measuring cups or a kitchen scale*
  • A pour-over cone (aka a drip brewer) or carafe
  • A coffee filter that fits the pour-over cone or carafe
  • A 16-ounce or larger mason jar (if not using a carafe)
  • Tea kettle – preferably a goose-neck shape made for pour-over brewing

Directions:

  1. Fill the mason jar or carafe with the 2 cups/8 oz./230 g. ice.
  2. Set a filter in the brewer, set it over the mason jar (if using) for brewing, and add the coffee grounds.
  3. Bring the water to a boil. Slowly pour just a bit of the water over the grounds – just enough to cause the coffee to expand (also known as “blooming”). Once all of that water has dripped through, slowly pour about half of the remaining water over the top. When that has finished dripping through, slowly pour the remaining water over the top. Let drain completely.
  4. If using a mason jar, remove the drip brewer. If using a carafe, remove the filter and grounds then pour into a glass. Add ice, cream, and/or sugar if desired. Add additional ice, cream, and/or sugar if desired and stir. Serve immediately.

* If using a kitchen scale, simple zero it out before adding each item. So you would set your jar/carafe on the scale, zero it out, and add ice cubes until the scale reads 8 ounces (or 230 grams). Set the brewer over the top and zero it out. Add coffee until the scale reads 1 ounce (or 30 grams), zero it out, and continue with water.

All images and text © for Kitchen Treaty.

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Silk and So Delicious Dairy Free Creamers. The opinions and text are all mine.

How to Make Japanese-Style Iced Coffee - A much faster alternative to cold brew, this method gives you high-quality iced coffee in minutes. It's even simpler and faster when you use a cone drip brewer and a mason jar!

Karen Raye

Kare is a vegetarian home cook living among carnivores. She loves creating irresistible and flexible recipes that help multi-vore families like hers keep the peace - deliciously.